JPEG images are compressed so that JPEG files can become physically smaller than their original size. JPEG compression works by throwing away data that would not be seen in the final image; this data is called visual information. Any JPEG or JPEG image has an association with one or more colors that will never be used; for example, for text, anything darker than black (RGB value “0”) and brighter than white (RGB value “255”) will typically not appear on screen at all because JPEG’s 8-bit color system provides only 256 different colors.

When you open your JPEG file in your favorite photo editing program, the first thing you’ll want to do is save it as a JPEG or JPEG image. You might want to do this if JPEG supported transparency, which JPEG doesn’t, but JPEG is still useful because it can be compressed for efficient storage and transmission over the internet.

JPEG does have the capability of having a clipping path associated with the file. This means that you could create an alpha channel in an advanced graphics program, save it as JPG, open up your JPEG image in photo editing software, load your alpha channel as a Photoshop clipping path, use the “crop” tool to cut out just what you want to show on-screen (like only the arms), then save it as another JPEG.

There are several programs available that will create JPEGs with transparency built-in. These JPEGs are sometimes called “transparent JPEGs” because of the transparency effect, but technically JPEG is already transparent. JPEG’s limitations prevent JPEG from displaying true transparency, where there would be no background at all (like for an image behind your text). JPEG cannot do this because JPEG does not support alpha channels.

There is another way to use JPEG files with alpha channels even though JPEG doesn’t support them. If you make a clipping path in Photoshop, then save it as a JPEG image, that JPEG image will have transparency built-in; however, this type of “clipping path” isn’t doing anything. The file size of the empty (or blank) alpha channel will be anywhere between 50% larger to many times larger than JPEG’s file size. JPEG files have the best compression, so it doesn’t make sense to use an alpha channel much larger without doing anything.

To use this clipping path:

  1. Download the Large size of the image if it is available.
  2. Open your JPEG image in photo editing software.
  3. Load your JPEG image as a Photoshop clipping path, then crop just what you want using the “crop” tool.
  4. Save your JPEG image with transparency built-in.

This can be done by opening up your JPEG image in photo editing software, loading it as a Photoshop clipping path, cropping out what you want to show on-screen (like only the arms), saving it with “Save As…” and selecting JPEG as the file type. JPEG images can only be saved as JPEGs, so JPEG is your best choice if you need transparency.

JPEG does have the ability to have a clipping path associated with the file. JPEG files are compressed so that JPEG files can become physically smaller than their original size. JPEG compression works by throwing away data that would not be seen in the final image; this data is called visual information. Any

When you open a JPEG in your favorite JPEG image editing software, the first thing you’ll want to do is save it as JPEG or JPEG image. You might want to do this if JPEG supported transparency, which JPEG doesn’t, but JPEG is still useful because it can be compressed for efficient storage and transmission over the internet.